Channel Island Foxes v Jaguars: A night of comedy with Santa Barbara Zoo

On Saturday, November 5, Channel Island Foxes will be pitted against Jaguars in a comedy face-off, presented by the Santa Barabara Zoo at the Discovery Pavilion.

S.P.E.C.I.E.S. founder and director, Anthony Giordano, goes up against Tim Connan, a biologist for the U.S. National Park Service at Channel Islands National Park. The two experts are paired up with a comedian from LA’s Improv theatre and “compete” against each other for points, with local celebrities judging.

So come along to the Discovery Pavilion this Saturday to find out whether Channel Island Foxes or Jaguars will come out on top!

Doors open at 7 p.m. for 7:30 p.m. performances. Tickets are $15 general admission, $12 for Santa Barbara Zoo members. Purchase at the door or online at www.sbzoo.org. For more information, call 962-5339. Seating is first-come, first-served; early arrival suggested.

Student Conference on Conservation Science – New York

The Center for Biodiversity and Conservation is organizing its seventh annual Student Conference on Conservation Science in New York on 20-22 of October. Graduate students, post-docs and early-career professionals are invited to take part in the only international series of conservation conferences featuring students. The event provides an opportunity to network, gain experience, present and get feedback on their work.

Prizes are awarded for best talk, speed talk and poster.

S.P.E.C.I.E.S. founder and director, Anthony Giordano, will be attending the event as an advisor and mentor to international students.

For more information on how to attend please see the American Museum of Natural History website.

Connecting landscapes with Mountain Lions

Like the wolf and grizzly bear, the mountain lion, cougar, or puma, North America’s largest cat, was once vilified as a pest to the livestock industry. Historically ranging from coast to coast, puma populations today continue to push eastward and reclaim areas they formerly inhabited, and as they do, they are nothing short of an ongoing conservation success story. Today however, no state has more of them than California. As encroachment of development into our wild spaces, increased demand for dwindling water supplies, and expanding transportation infrastructure, all threaten to further fragment (or separate) the state’s landscapes, can we look to the puma as a tool for implementing logical conservation strategies, and to protect wildness, water, and the ecological foundation that is essential to healthy human and wildlife communities alike?

Join Anthony Giordano, local conservation biologist, wildlife ecologist, and founder and director of S.P.E.C.I.E.S, on Wednesday, November 2nd from 7 – 8pm for a FREE open-to-the-public presentation to learn about the ways humans and mountain lions can peacefully coexist.

The event will take place on Wednesday, November 2 at 7pm at the Poinsettia Pavilion in Ventura. To reserve a place visit www.venturahillsides.org/events and click on the RVSP button.